Life Is A Carousel

“Carousel horses are not just made of wood, they are painted with memories.” Bette Largent

The Herschell-Spillman Carousel, aka The Over-the-Jumps Carousel has been at the Little Rock Zoo since 2007.

It was first exhibited at the 1924 Arkansas State Fair and it is believed to be the last operating “Over-The-Jumps” type of carousel in the world.

More information on this historic carousel can be found on the zoo’s website:

https://www.littlerockzoo.com/visit/over-the-jumps-carousel/

Utley House

Utley House, 3 April 2022

The E. F. Utley house was built between 1914 and 1922 in Cabot, Lonoke, Arkansas and was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1998.

Dr. F. E. Utley (Francis Edwin Utley) who was born 10 Feb 1881 in Greenbrier, Faulkner County, Arkansas to Francis David Utley and Amanda Melvina Snow. Dr. Utley married Rosa Lee Ray on 29 Dec 1901 in Hardinville, Faulkner County, Arkansas. He died in the house on 25 Oct 1952 and was buried at Mt Carmel Cemetery in Cabot.

(Note: listed on the 1940 US Federal Census twice. Once at home with the family and the other as a TB patient at the Arkansas State Tuberculous Sanitarium near Booneville in Logan County.)

Rosa Lee Ray was born 27 August 1881 in Arkansas and died 1 Dec 1955 in Pulaski County, Arkansas. She is buried next to her husband.

The Utley’s had three children; Arlis Dee Utley, Geneva Pauline Utley and Francis Edward Utley, Jr.

Feels Like Home

While researching a new photo project I fell in love with this little shotgun house in Little Rock. I had never seen it in person before but I felt strangely connected to the house by looking at pictures of the place online.

Home of Wendel and Magdalena Harveil in the 1920s.

A week later, I’m researching my 3rd great-grandparents and, low and behold, I see that their address looked awfully familiar. Sure enough, the little house I felt connected to is exactly where they lived in the 1920’s.

There are not many of these shotgun style houses, built between 1890 and 1920, left in Little Rock and Preserve Arkansas has listed them as the “Most Endangered Places” in Arkansas.

Dr. E. F. Utley House, Cabot, Arkansas

 

Utley House, Cabot, Arkansas

Wow, there’s only two places in Cabot that are on the National Register of Historic Places. Only one house and the Confederate Cemetery. I photographed 10 more houses the other day and I know there’s still more in town that could be eligible.
 
The 2 1/2 story Dr. E. F. Utley House, at 401 W. Pine Street in Cabot, was built sometime between 1914 and 1922 and is an example of an “American Foursquare” with Colonial Revival-style detailing.
 
During the time it was constructed, Cabot had a population around 447 people and had a bank, a weekly newspaper, two nurseries and a telephone exchange.
 
The property is known as the Utley House for Dr. E. F. Utley, a local “horse and buggy” doctor who owned, lived and saw patients in the house from about 1935 to 1955.
 
The house has been reported to be haunted by the current owner. Sounds of people walking across the upper floors and down the stairs are often heard. The front entrance door has also been seen to open by itself even when fully latched.
 
The property was listed in National Register of Historic Places on June 3, 1998. (By a strange coincidence, this image was taken June 3, 2017, 19 years later)

44th Annual Territorial Fair at the Historic Arkansas Museum

The 44th Annual Territorial Fair at the Historical Arkansas Museum was this past Saturday, May 14 from 10 am to 4 pm.

The emphasis at this years fair was Historic Arkansas Foodways. There were pioneer cooking and dutch oven cooking demonstrations using 19th century pioneer recipes.

Other activites at the fair were living history performances, live music, maypole dancing, blacksmith demonstrations, pioneer games and crafts.